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Storm Season Tips:

Protecting your home and vehicles from hail

Summer storm season is upon us and, as your best Red Deer insurance broker, we have put together a list actions that you can take to protect your home from hail damage. We encourage you to chat with your insurance broker to discuss specific strategies for upgrading your home to hail resistance. If you are renovating, replacing your roof or replacing siding, make it a priority to call us first for advice on what grade and product to consider. Various Insurance companies offer policy discounts for upgraded siding and shingles that are rated for higher impact resistance.

EASY:

The simplest and most common form of risk mitigation for your vehicle during a storm is to park it in a protected structure, such as a garage. If this isn’t possible, the use of car covers or blankets is recommended. Several car cover manufacturers make covers and blankets that are hail resistant.

Use window safety films to protect windows, doors, and skylights.

MEDIUM:

When re-roofing, install a ice and water shield underlay (preferably self-adhering and waterproof).

Use a roofing product that has Underwriters Laboratories UL2218 Class 4 impact resistance rating. And remember, some insurance companies will offer a discount on your premiums when your home has higher rated shingles.

ADVANCED:

Consider using cement board (Hardie Board or fiber) in place of aluminum or vinyl siding for your home – especially if you are in a high risk hail zone.

Purchase a home with steeper sloping roofs. Flatter roofs are more susceptible to hail damage.

What are we doing for you?

Insurers are working hard to prevent hail damage. Have you noticed the planes that fly into the clouds when there is a hail or thunderstorm warning? Cloud seeding disperses silver iodide into the developing clouds to change the physical properties of the cloud, which changes the type of precipitation the cloud forms. Seeding doesn’t eliminate hail, but it does reduce the size of hail the cloud creates.

Take our Quiz

Want to know your hail damage risk score? Hop over to our Facebook or Instagram and measure your risk.

Distracted Driving in Alberta

False information is circulating regarding Distracted Driving in Alberta. There is no new law coming into effect for February 1 and there will be no changes to the existing law. The rumors around new laws or stricter penalties are false. But, please know that distracted driving penalties are still very serious. With insurance companies cracking down on their underwriting, a distracted driving ticket could mean loss of coverage, a $287 fine, and 3 demerits.

Here’s an overview from the Government of Alberta on what is restricted.

“Alberta’s distracted driving law applies to all vehicles as defined by the Traffic Safety Act and all roads in Alberta. It restricts drivers from doing any of the following, even while stopped at red lights:

  • using hand-held cell phones
  • texting or e-mailing
  • using electronic devices such as laptop computers, video games, cameras, video entertainment displays, and programming portable audio players such as MP3 players
  • entering information on GPS units
  • reading printed materials in the vehicle
  • writing, printing or sketching
  • personal grooming such as brushing and flossing teeth, putting on makeup, curling hair, clipping nails or shaving

You can be charged with distracted driving, even if your driving performance does not appear to be affected. If you commit a moving violation while distracted, you could receive two tickets — one for distracted driving and one for the moving violation.
Under the Traffic Safety Act police also have the discretion to lay charges if you are engaging in other activities while driving that impair your ability to drive safely.
For example, you can be charged with distracted driving if you are distracted by your pet while driving. Police can also charge you if you permit anything to:

  • occupy the front seat of your vehicle that interferes with your access to the vehicle controls and the safe operation of the vehicle
  • obstruct your clear vision in any direction

Activities that are not specifically restricted under the law are:

  • using a cell phone in hands-free mode – the device is not held in the driver’s hand and is activated by voice or a single touch to the device
  • using an earphone – if it is used in a hands-free or voice-activated manner
  • drinking beverages – coffee, water or pop
  • eating a snack
  • smoking
  • talking with passengers
  • listening to a portable audio player – as long as it is set up before you begin driving
  • calling emergency services such as 9-1-1 with a hand-held cell phone
  • using two-way radios or hand-held radios (also known as CB radios) when a driver is required to remain in contact with one’s employer, such as when escorting oversized vehicles or when participating in search, rescue and emergency management situations
  • permitting the display screen of the following:
    • a GPS navigation system – as long as the system is affixed to the vehicle and programmed before you begin driving or the system is voice-activated. You cannot hold the unit or manually enter information while driving
    • a collision-avoidance system
    • a gauge, instrument, device or system that provides information about the vehicle’s systems or the vehicle’s location
    • a dispatch system for transporting passengers
    • a logistical transportation tracking system that tracks vehicle location, driver status or the delivery of goods for commercial purposes
    • an alcohol ignition interlock device

Under the Traffic Safety Act, emergency vehicles include police service vehicles, fire response units, ambulances and gas disconnection units. Drivers of emergency vehicles are able to use hand-held communication devices or other electronic devices only when acting within the scope of their employment.

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